Hi. Tape Op is made possible by our advertisers.

Please support them by clicking on their ads.

<     Issue #106     >

 
 
 
 

Hi. Tape Op
is made
possible
by our advertisers.

Please support them by clicking on their ads.

 

Additions to TapeOp.com

For the past 11 years, Greg Wilkinson has recorded the Bay Area's crustiest punk/hardcore/grindcore/death metal/doom/black metal at Earhammer, his warehouse studio in West Oakland. He's also played...
 
Master clocks are a near necessity if you own multiple digital audio devices that are interconnected. Sure, you can forgo a master clock and just chain one digital device to the next, each...
 
I caught up with David J. Haskins, a member of the influential bands Bauhaus and Love and Rockets, during a book tour for his new memoir, Who Killed Mr....
 
We are witnessing the dawn of dramatic format changes for audio delivery. On the one hand, we now have streaming audio and, on the other hand, we have the movement away from compressed digital formats toward higher-resolution digital files. The CD...
 
Ocean Way Recording began in a garage in Santa Monica, California, in 1968, as a place to showcase owner Allen Side's custom monitors. From these humble beginnings the empire expanded to include...
 
Ace Hotel has long been a favorite among artist/studio types, so when we heard the news that they were going to beginoffering quality recording gear as a literal hotel service, it made sense. Featured behind their tailored front desk you'll find...
 
The name Jim Scott has graced many excellent albums since he made his debut as first engineer on Sting's The Dream of the Blue Turtles. Artists as varied as the Dixie Chicks, Wilco, John Fogerty, the...
 
Soundtoys Decapitator has been around for a while now, and it's one of my favorite plug-ins. I was surprised when Andy Hong asked if I wanted to review it — oddly, it had never been reviewed in...
 
The legendary TG12345 consoles made by EMI are very rare and scattered around the world, from England to Brazil. If you have scratched the surface of recording history, you know the impact that EMI...
 
Sometimes, it's right in front of your face, and you just don't see it. You're working with your preconceptions and past experiences — and it takes a little time, a flat out mistake, or just...
 
 
 

Welcome to the Mar/Apr 2015 issue of Tape Op!

As we move through life, and add a few years to our experiences, it's only natural that we start losing friends along the way. We are all merely mortal. The last several months have been brutal. We lost Memphis'Ardent Studios stalwarts John Hampton and John Fry within a week of each other in December. Renowned Seedy Underbelly Studio owner, John Kuker, had just begun renovating Minnesota's legendary Pachyderm Studio before his unfortunate passing in February. On a note closer to home for me, Bill Gladfelter, one of my best intern/assistants ever (and later to become an ATR Services employee), passed away in November last year at 35 years old. All of this leaves me with a dark cloud hovering above, no matter how well other aspects of my life may be going. I'm not getting any younger either...

But one of the saddest losses was one of the most amazing people I have ever met. Ian Patrick McLagan, known to most as "Mac," was the keyboardist for the Small Faces, Faces, the Rolling Stones (notably on "Miss You"), Bonnie Raitt, and Billy Bragg. He also led his super fun Bump Band for years in Austin, Texas. When Laura Thurmond (our trusty ad rep) and I threw the first Tape Op Party during SXSW (an event since mothballed), one of our guests was an ebullient Mac. "I love Tape Op," he exclaimed, while seemingly bouncing off the walls with some sort of magical, music-fueled energy. Over the years we'd meet up during SXSW, both of us with too many things to do at once; but he was always smiling, happy, and ready with a hilarious comment. Thanks to this magazine, I have met many of my idols and it's always a pleasure, though sometimes a bitter surprise. The music business has a way of grinding people down if they let it. To meet one of your favorite musicians, and to find out how creative and positive they still are, is very special. Everyone that met Mac along the way knew he was someone to treasure. We miss you, my friend.

We are lucky to meet, love, share, and collaborate with others along the journey that life offers us. Don't take it for granted. 

#106

Hi. Tape Op is only made possible by our advertisers.

Please support them by clicking on their ads.