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Additions to TapeOp.com

Throughout the years, Nick Launay has worked with Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds, PiL, Gang of Four, Lou Reed, Kate Bush, Midnight Oil, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Arcade Fire, INXS, Talking Heads/David Byrne,...
 
The ease of modern music software has allowed for the creation of an abundance of average, homogenous, electronic records; but over the last 14 years, Dan Snaith's project, Caribou, has...
 
Berkeley, California's Keith McMillen Instruments (KMI) has a solid reputation for innovation in an industry sometimes known for releasing products that are often just another variation on a common...
 
I opened my commercial recording studio (Jackpot! Recording) in 1997, after years of simultaneously having a busy home studio while working day jobs to pay the rent. Making this leap to a full-time recording engineer/studio owner was terrifying. I...
 
Mark Ronson got his start as a young DJ in NYC before going on to work with Amy Winehouse, Nikka Costa, Lily Allen, Macy Gray, Saigon, Adele, Paul McCartney, Duran Duran, and many others. Mark's...
 
It is truly remarkable to step back and examine the full societal impact that some recording engineers and mixers have had on American culture. During his 18-year tenure as Chief Engineer for Motown...
 
Rudy Van Gelder's legend looms large, yet he has avoided most interviews throughout his 50-plus years in the recording biz. He has never discussed his techniques, and even in the following...
 
There's a dark cloud over Memphis this week I guess. First John Hampton, and now John Fry passes away. Fry's Ardent Studios is one of the most important American studios ever. We all shall miss this gracious and brilliant man. Read our interview with...
 
Very sadly, long-time and industry-renowned Ardent Studios producer/engineer John Hampton just passed away. John began at Ardent in 1977, and since then has been awarded 23 gold and platinum records, several Grammy nominations and three Grammy wins....
 
I have been privileged twice now, while interviewing studio owners for this magazine, to have encountered true mavericks. People whose views on the current state of "The Music Industry" have been...
 
 
 

Welcome to the Jan/Feb 2015 issue of Tape Op!

When we're recording music, it always feels like there's never enough time. Whenever I finish a mix, or an entire album, I always think, "But what if we'd had more time?" We could explore more possibilities. We could spend longer on a mix. Track more vocal takes, looking for the magical performance. Maybe the artist should have practiced more? Should we have taken a few days off between tracking and mixing? It seems as if every mix project I get ends up tracking overdubs up to the last minute, no matter how far in advance they book the session. But I also must be highly aware of the days allotted for sessions, and find ways to get the work done on time and at the highest quality possible.

When we plan to use a commercial recording studio we "book time." Our budget is dependent on how much time we estimate for a project. If we record at home, we might consider the sessions unrestricted by time, but we all know we have to "set aside" time in order to have the time to do the recording. Because music is an art based in time, it takes time to write and create, and it takes time to capture and manipulate in the studio. Do you have enough time to get done what you needed? Can the project be completed in time?

It all comes down to time. It always has and always will. How will you spend your time?

#105

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